• By: Allison McCarthy, MBA | amccarthy@barlowmccarthy.com Some see it as an opportunity to slow down but don’t let yourself be fooled.  This is a great time to be doing all you can to build up your provider recruitment pipeline. Just adapt your approach to fit the time of year. For example: People are in a more generous mood and patient schedules at a slower pace. Give your physicians a short list and ask them to network with potential prospects. This is the time of year when residents learn whether they have been accepted into a fellowship. Prepare a list of those that told you that was their plan and reach back to see if it got fulfilled.  If not, they

    Dec 20,
  • By: Allison McCarthy, MBA | amccarthy@barlowmccarthy.com During a client’s physician leadership meeting, the hospital CEO expressed appreciation to them and their colleagues for “making the hospital volume so strong over the past few months.” My initial reaction was “good for him” for giving those physicians that recognition – for there are so many that do not. But then I looked at the faces of these physician leaders and saw blank expressions.  No smiles, no nods – no reaction at all.  The CEO’s expression of gratitude didn’t seem to resonate. Why not? Then I read a recent Harvard Business School article by Heidi Grant Halvorson, Ph.D., titled “Stop Making Gratitude All About You.” Dr. Halvorson noted that a common mistake when

    Aug 30,
  • By: Allison McCarthy | amccarthy@barlowmccarthy.com One of the basic tenets of sales is to know our product.  In physician recruitment, product includes: Geographic location Hospital/Health System/Group Practice Practice opportunity including the details most important to that specialty Most physician recruiters have mastered the first two pieces – which are vitally important in our promotion of practice opportunities. Studies show that physicians, particularly those new to practice, consider geographic location as a key initial search criteria. Plus, we know that those hospitals, health systems, or physician groups with brand recognition, or in highly desirable geographic locations, have to do more to screen out than to pull leads in. But geographic and organizational knowledge is just the superficial level. To actually engage

    May 17,
  • By: Allison McCarthy, MBA | amccarthy@barlowmccarthy.com Learning to say “no” effectively is one of the hardest skills to learn.  For “can do” people like those of us in physician recruitment and relations roles, it can be particularly challenging.  We know that additional assignments will distract from current obligations – undermining our ability to be successful.  But we also don’t want to appear “difficult to work with.” So how do we turn down a request without being perceived as not a team player? Here are a few pointers from others who have mastered this skill. Take a Pause I’ve started to practice this approach a bit more.  And, I have to say it does help to give some time to think

    Apr 19,
  • By: Allison McCarthy. MBA Having the right amount of detail to begin a physician search is critical. That detail is what enables us as physician recruiters to effectively describe the position to prospects and candidates. Many of us are sending questionnaires and repeated email requests to internal stakeholders to get enough background information to tell the practice opportunity’s story.  And, too often, we don’t get quite what we need. Maybe we should become more like journalists. By that I mean, learning and using the skills and techniques that journalists use to research a story. Here are a few that come to mind: Identify the Right Interviewee – This often involves multiple people with each person offering unique knowledge or perspectives.

    Mar 16,